Plamegate (Updated)

7/15/07

clipped from www.btcnews.com

The one who used her name


I’m puzzled. When Karl Rove finally spoke in public about the Plame Affair last week, he said that Armitage was the one who “used her name.” But didn’t Novak look it up in Who’s Who?

Aha. I see you subscribe to the immaculate leak theory of Plameogenesis.

It’s true that Novak started making that claim after the investigation began, but a couple of months earlier he told some reporters from Newsday, “I didn’t dig it out; it was given to me. They thought it was significant, they gave me the name, and I used it.”

They?

The “two senior administration officials” who were the sources for his original column.

And who were they again?

Armitage and Rove.

But how did Armitage and Rove know about Valerie?

Well, Armitage first heard about the Wilson affair from Marc Grossman, an Undersecretary of State. I’m not sure who told Rove.

  blog it

7/14/07

The untouchable Richard Armitage

As everybody knows by now, it was Richard L. Armitage, former deputy secretary of state, who was the original source of Robert Novak’s now-famous column of July 14, 2003, in which Valerie Plame, wife of Joseph Wilson, was outed as a CIA operative.

Despite the fact Fitzgerald knew the source of the leak, he decided to go after reporters who refused to name their sources. Thus, Times reporter Judith Miller spent 85 days in jail for refusing to reveal her sources to the prosecutor. She was finally released when she agreed to testify before a grand jury.

blog it

7/9/07

clipped from www.suntimes.com

Why would the CIA send Joseph Wilson, not an expert in nuclear proliferation and with no intelligence experience, on the mission to Niger?

“Well,” Armitage replied, “you know his wife works at CIA, and she suggested that he be sent to Niger.” “His wife works at CIA?” I asked. “Yeah, in counterproliferation.”

He mentioned her first name, Valerie. Armitage smiled and said: “That’s real Evans and Novak, isn’t it?” I believe he meant that was the kind of inside information that my late partner, Rowland Evans, and I had featured in our column for so long. I interpreted that as meaning Armitage expected to see the item published in my column.

The exchange about Wilson’s wife lasted no more than sixty seconds.

blog it

7/8/07

I thought back to something I had tripped upon a while ago, something that involved Libby, which happened on September 10, 2001, the day before the twin towers were struck.

SEPTEMBER 10, 2001 A CIA plan to strike at al Qaeda in Afghanistan, including support for the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance, is given to the White House. Sen. Dianne Feinstein asks for a meeting with Vice President Dick Cheney. The California Democrat is told that Cheney’s staff would need six months to prepare for a meeting.

I was deeply concerned as to whether our house was in order to prevent a terrorist attack. My work on the Intelligence Committee and as chair of the Technology and Terrorism Subcommittee had given me a sense of foreboding for some time. I had no specific data leading to a possible attack.

blog it

7/5/07

President Bush’s Decision to Commute Scooter Libby’s Sentence: Why It’s Indefensible, Even if One Agrees with Republican Critiques of the Sentence

Most of what people are saying about President Bush’s decision to commute Scooter Libby’s sentence is colored by their views of the Iraq war, and of the Bush Administration’s national security policies.

But there is an obligation to make some assessment. We are living through perilous political times. In the wake of the Clinton impeachment, scandals galore, and stunning claims of Executive power and governmental secrecy, the commutation raises yet further concern that a paralyzing partisanship has swallowed our ability to engage in reasoned politics and that, at the risk of being alarmist, the vitality of our democracy is threatened.

blog it

7/3/07

Letter to a Neighbor

Received a copy of David Corn’s latest brilliance. He takes NY Times columnist David Brooks to task and schools him. What David Corn did not know is that Mr. Brooks lives about 250 feet from my front door. So I took the opportunity to pen the following note, welcoming him to the neighborhood, and giving him a copy of Mr. Corn’s excellent work. Here is my letter, which I dropped off tonight:

blog it

The outcry against President Bush’s decision to commute Scooter Libby’s sentence is misplaced. President Bush acted hours after the U.S. Court of Appeals denied Libby bail pending appeal. That judicial decision was entirely political. The appellate judges had to see that Libby’s arguments on appeal were sound and strong — that under existing law he was entitled to bail pending appeal. (That is why I joined several other law professors in filing an amicus brief on this limited issue.)

blog it

Quick Vote (from CNN)

Was President Bush right to commute Lewis “Scooter” Libby’s prison sentence?

Yes 21% 11632
No 79% 44715
Total Votes: 56347

clipped from www.cnn.com

Bush commutes Libby’s prison sentence

WASHINGTON (CNN) — President Bush on Monday spared I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby from prison, commuting the former White House aide’s 30-month prison term.

blog it

6/14/07

clipped from www.truthout.org

Judge Won’t Delay Libby Prison Term

By Neil A. Lewis and David Stout

The New York Times

A federal judge refused today to delay the start of the prison sentence for I. Lewis Libby Jr. in the CIA leak case while he appeals his conviction, meaning he could be ordered to surrender within two months.

The ruling intensifies the legal and political drama surrounding Mr. Libby, the former chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney who was convicted of perjury, making false statements and obstructing justice.

blog it

Plamegate (Updated)

7/15/07

clipped from www.btcnews.com

The one who used her name


I’m puzzled. When Karl Rove finally spoke in public about the Plame Affair last week, he said that Armitage was the one who “used her name.” But didn’t Novak look it up in Who’s Who?

Aha. I see you subscribe to the immaculate leak theory of Plameogenesis.

It’s true that Novak started making that claim after the investigation began, but a couple of months earlier he told some reporters from Newsday, “I didn’t dig it out; it was given to me. They thought it was significant, they gave me the name, and I used it.”

They?

The “two senior administration officials” who were the sources for his original column.

And who were they again?

Armitage and Rove.

But how did Armitage and Rove know about Valerie?

Well, Armitage first heard about the Wilson affair from Marc Grossman, an Undersecretary of State. I’m not sure who told Rove.

  blog it

7/14/07

The untouchable Richard Armitage

As everybody knows by now, it was Richard L. Armitage, former deputy secretary of state, who was the original source of Robert Novak’s now-famous column of July 14, 2003, in which Valerie Plame, wife of Joseph Wilson, was outed as a CIA operative.

Despite the fact Fitzgerald knew the source of the leak, he decided to go after reporters who refused to name their sources. Thus, Times reporter Judith Miller spent 85 days in jail for refusing to reveal her sources to the prosecutor. She was finally released when she agreed to testify before a grand jury.

blog it

7/9/07

clipped from www.suntimes.com

Why would the CIA send Joseph Wilson, not an expert in nuclear proliferation and with no intelligence experience, on the mission to Niger?

“Well,” Armitage replied, “you know his wife works at CIA, and she suggested that he be sent to Niger.” “His wife works at CIA?” I asked. “Yeah, in counterproliferation.”

He mentioned her first name, Valerie. Armitage smiled and said: “That’s real Evans and Novak, isn’t it?” I believe he meant that was the kind of inside information that my late partner, Rowland Evans, and I had featured in our column for so long. I interpreted that as meaning Armitage expected to see the item published in my column.

The exchange about Wilson’s wife lasted no more than sixty seconds.

blog it

7/8/07

I thought back to something I had tripped upon a while ago, something that involved Libby, which happened on September 10, 2001, the day before the twin towers were struck.

SEPTEMBER 10, 2001 A CIA plan to strike at al Qaeda in Afghanistan, including support for the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance, is given to the White House. Sen. Dianne Feinstein asks for a meeting with Vice President Dick Cheney. The California Democrat is told that Cheney’s staff would need six months to prepare for a meeting.

I was deeply concerned as to whether our house was in order to prevent a terrorist attack. My work on the Intelligence Committee and as chair of the Technology and Terrorism Subcommittee had given me a sense of foreboding for some time. I had no specific data leading to a possible attack.

blog it

7/5/07

President Bush’s Decision to Commute Scooter Libby’s Sentence: Why It’s Indefensible, Even if One Agrees with Republican Critiques of the Sentence

Most of what people are saying about President Bush’s decision to commute Scooter Libby’s sentence is colored by their views of the Iraq war, and of the Bush Administration’s national security policies.

But there is an obligation to make some assessment. We are living through perilous political times. In the wake of the Clinton impeachment, scandals galore, and stunning claims of Executive power and governmental secrecy, the commutation raises yet further concern that a paralyzing partisanship has swallowed our ability to engage in reasoned politics and that, at the risk of being alarmist, the vitality of our democracy is threatened.

blog it

7/3/07

Letter to a Neighbor

Received a copy of David Corn’s latest brilliance. He takes NY Times columnist David Brooks to task and schools him. What David Corn did not know is that Mr. Brooks lives about 250 feet from my front door. So I took the opportunity to pen the following note, welcoming him to the neighborhood, and giving him a copy of Mr. Corn’s excellent work. Here is my letter, which I dropped off tonight:

blog it

The outcry against President Bush’s decision to commute Scooter Libby’s sentence is misplaced. President Bush acted hours after the U.S. Court of Appeals denied Libby bail pending appeal. That judicial decision was entirely political. The appellate judges had to see that Libby’s arguments on appeal were sound and strong — that under existing law he was entitled to bail pending appeal. (That is why I joined several other law professors in filing an amicus brief on this limited issue.)

blog it

Quick Vote (from CNN)

Was President Bush right to commute Lewis “Scooter” Libby’s prison sentence?

Yes 21% 11632
No 79% 44715
Total Votes: 56347

clipped from www.cnn.com

Bush commutes Libby’s prison sentence

WASHINGTON (CNN) — President Bush on Monday spared I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby from prison, commuting the former White House aide’s 30-month prison term.

blog it

6/14/07

clipped from www.truthout.org

Judge Won’t Delay Libby Prison Term

By Neil A. Lewis and David Stout

The New York Times

A federal judge refused today to delay the start of the prison sentence for I. Lewis Libby Jr. in the CIA leak case while he appeals his conviction, meaning he could be ordered to surrender within two months.

The ruling intensifies the legal and political drama surrounding Mr. Libby, the former chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney who was convicted of perjury, making false statements and obstructing justice.

blog it

The White House Press Whores Roaring in Laughter

The president refuses to answer questions at a press conference yesterday and the hilarity ensues. So what if three of the top administration officials outed a CIA officer? (Laughter) So what if the president refuses to say whether or not he authorized it? (Laughter) So what if he once said that he would fire whomever was involved in the outing? (Laughter)

Source: http://blondesense.blogspot.com/2007/02/white-house-press-whores-roaring-in.html

Washington Post Coverage: Where’s the Accountability?, The Libby-Cheney Bummer, Washington Journalism on Trial

The White House Press Whores Roaring in Laughter

The president refuses to answer questions at a press conference yesterday and the hilarity ensues. So what if three of the top administration officials outed a CIA officer? (Laughter) So what if the president refuses to say whether or not he authorized it? (Laughter) So what if he once said that he would fire whomever was involved in the outing? (Laughter)

Source: http://blondesense.blogspot.com/2007/02/white-house-press-whores-roaring-in.html

Washington Post Coverage: Where’s the Accountability?, The Libby-Cheney Bummer, Washington Journalism on Trial

[From Google Reader] Pincus Reveals Fleischer As Leak Source

Washington Post reporter Walter Pincus testified in court this morning that then-White House press secretary Ari Fleischer, not I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby, was the first person to tell him that a prominent critic of the Iraq war was married to undercover CIA officer Valerie Plame….

Source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/12/AR2007021200588.html?nav=rss_politics

[From Google Reader] Pincus Reveals Fleischer As Leak Source

Washington Post reporter Walter Pincus testified in court this morning that then-White House press secretary Ari Fleischer, not I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby, was the first person to tell him that a prominent critic of the Iraq war was married to undercover CIA officer Valerie Plame….

Source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/12/AR2007021200588.html?nav=rss_politics

Politics: Dispatches From the Scooter Libby Trial

Slate Magazine
politics
Dispatches From the Scooter Libby Trial
The Grand Jury Grilling.
By John Dickerson, Dahlia Lithwick, and Seth Stevenson
Updated Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2007, at 10:50 PM ET



From: Seth Stevenson
Subject: The Grand Jury Grilling

Posted Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2007, at 10:50 PM ET

9:55 a.m: Let’s fire up the tape player for Tuesday’s grand jury recordings. The courtroom speakers fill the air with Scooter Libby’s reedy, disembodied voice.

Hearing 10 seconds of my own voice played back to me can give me the willies. I can’t imagine how uncomfortable Libby must feel, hearing himself talk for hour after hour, with dozens of strangers intently listening in. (Of course, the actual grand jury grilling he endured was no doubt vastly more uncomfortable, so perhaps this is tranquil by comparison.)

To continue reading, click here.

John Dickerson is Slate‘s chief political correspondent and author of On Her Trail. He can be reached at slatepolitics@gmail.com.
Dahlia Lithwick is a Slate senior editor.
Seth Stevenson is a frequent contributor to Slate.

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